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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

A Thriving Practice as a Learning Specialist


Did you know that teachers stay in the field of education for an average of only two years? Many of these people slogged through years upon years of schooling and accrue tens of thousands of school-based loans only to find that the job they longed for was nonexistent.  What's the next step?

Did You Ever Consider Being a Learning Specialist?
I have been getting a ton of questions about what it takes to create a learning specialist practice.  Do you have any burning questions about how I do it - so you can do it too?  I've created a 1-2 minute survey, that's only three questions.  I would be ever so grateful if you could fill it out for me - as I want to be sure to meet your needs.  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V5S6PDJ
If you would like to sign up for my Successful Learning Specialist Practice VIP list click on the following link: http://eepurl.com/bZG5In 

What is a Learning Specialist?
Learning specialists are teachers/coaches who are skilled at providing support to struggling students. They can find employment in private schools or set up a practice outside of formal schooling. These educators work individually or in small groups to provide intensive instruction and support that meets the individual needs of each learner. Often an expert in a number of subject areas, learning specialists also offer study strategies, memory techniques, metacognitive and focusing methods, and remedial lessons. They should also be versed in assistive technology, creating an intervention plan, conducting observations, defining reasonable accommodations, and assisting students to develop self-advocacy skills. Many learning specialists also offer reading, writing and/or math remediation as well as cognitive remedial training, homework help and direct communication with teachers and other professionals. Learning Specialists should be well educated in learning and cognition as well as alternative learning and multisensory teaching strategies. They should hold an undergraduate degree and preferably a master’s degree and/or doctorate in a field such as educational psychology, special education, neuropsychology, and or school psychology.  

Why Did I Become a Learning Specialist?
I went into the field of education because I wanted to empower struggling learners and help them to find their genius qualities and life's purpose.  When I finished my doctorate, I tried a number of positions.  I ran two college programs for students with learning disabilities, taught university courses, conducted teacher training as a consultant, and acted as a learning specialist in a private school.  I soon learned that the educational system was sadly broken and I continually found myself in positions where my hands were tied and I could not give the students what they needed and deserved. I decided to try one more thing before changing my profession altogether.  I created my own private practice and called it Learning to Learn.  I networked for a few weeks, and I've been slammed for the past 18 years.  Throughout this time, I've mastered the business end, collected and created the very best materials and documents, and utilized some amazing technology tools that make my practice a virtual no-brainer to run.

What are Some other Common Titles Used for This Profession?
There are a number of other common titles used in the private educational field, and each offer a slightly different expertise and focus.  
  • Educational Therapist
  • Learning/Academic Coach (Executive Functioning Coach, ADHD Coach)
  • Educational Specialist
  • Reading Specialist
  • Tutor
Actually, I use all the following titles to describe the work I do in my practice: learning specialist, educational therapist, coach and personal trainer for the brain.  Here is an article that I wrote that defines the Differences between a tutor, learning specialist and educational therapist

There is a great need for enthusiastic educators that can help students make it through their years of schooling.  What's more, you get to set your hours, wages, and approach.  If you have any further questions or comments, please share your thoughts below this blog.

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Online Zoom Sessions for Learning Specialists: Making Documents Interactive


Educational Therapists, Learning Specialists and Tutors can now use Zoom, a conferencing platform for free to improve online sessions and office appointments when meeting with students one-on-one. Compared to Skype, Google Hangout, and Facetime, Zoom is a more stable platform with some unique added features.

What are the Key Features?
  1. Zoom allows both participants to share pdf images, web pages, word processing and an interactive whiteboard.  When you select the green "share screen" option that is on the bottom menu of the zoom meeting, it opens a window that allows you to share anything that you have open on your desktop.  What's more, it allows either participant to share their iPhone or iPad screen. 
  2. My favorite feature is that the participants can also draw lines and shapes or type text on the screen so that activities and images become interactive.  Yes, if you have digital workbooks or images, you no longer have to print your activities!  You could even take a picture of a workbook page and share this in a zoom lesson, as long as that image is open on your computer.  This can save both time and money when prepping for appointments!  
  3. If you share the whiteboard with your students, it can be a nice way for the two of you to brainstorm ideas in a web.  It can also be a nice blank space to practice spelling activities.
  4. What's more, Zoom has the added feature of letting either party record the session.  This way strategies or snippets of your lessons can be shared with parents after the Zoom sessions is over.  As soon as you end your zoom session, your recording will be converted and saved to your computer as an mp4.  This can be mailed as an attachment or placed into dropbox and shared.
Can I See a Demonstration?
I did a demonstration of how I use Zoom in my online sessions by completing one of my Following Directions Intermediate activities called What am I?  

Resource Links:

You can sign up for Zoom at www.Zoom.us
You can also learn more about my Following Directions publications and get some free samples at http://bit.ly/1RCifY7

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Dyslexia and Voice Dream Reader: Discussion and Demonstration with Winston Chen


This blog shares my most recent video podcast featuring Winston Chen, the author of my favorite app for readers with dyslexia.  This is the first of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!

Winston founded Voice Dream while on sabbatical on an island north of the Arctic Circle and his flagship product Voice Dream Reader is an amazing technology device that offers text-to-voice for audiobooks, PDFs, and more.  This top-selling iOS app has a recent, free, comprehensive update with some new extraordinary features. Come learn about this creation and view a demonstration of this amazing tool that is changing the accessibility of text for individuals with dyslexia around the world.



Mentioned Resource Links:
Voice Dream Reader: http://www.voicedream.com/reader/
Voice Dream Writer: http://www.voicedream.com/writer/
Abbyy Fine Reader:  http://www.abbyy.com/finereader/
Scanner Pro 7:  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/scanner-pro-7-document-receipt/id333710667?mt=8
Cam Scanner:  https://www.camscanner.com/user/download
Snap to PDF:  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/snap2pdf-scan-documents-share/id472940721?mt=8
Prismo: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/prizmo-scanning-ocr-speech/id366791896?mt=8
Apprentice Alf:  http://www.epubor.com/apprentice-alf-drm-removal-tools.html

Best New Features:
1) Pac-man reading mode: The latest research at MIT and Harvard shows that anyone can double their reading speed with no loss of comprehension. This new technique combines audio, visual, and attention propulsion. The words disappear from the page slightly before they're spoken by text-to-speech, forcing the reader to read ahead visually with audio arriving a fraction of a second later. With practice, the results can be staggering.

2) Finger reading: Some readers struggle to follow even at the slowest speed, which also becomes distorted. With finger reading, the reader runs their finger under the words on the screen to hear each word.

3) Quickly browse text: On an iPhone 6s or 6s plus, you can press firmly on the fast forward button while the app is reading -- also called Force Touch -- to double the reading speed. Release it slightly to return to normal speed.

What’s New in 4.0.0 release of Voice Dream Reader?
•  A brilliant new user interface
•  Grid view and book cover images in the library.
•  Improved library organization: filters, flags, and sort order.
•  Visual appearance of the entire app uses the current color theme.
•  Experimental rich text
•  Support for images/illustrations for all documents.

Library Synchronization:
• Your entire library, including folders, reading locations, bookmarks and annotations are synchronized across all your devices using iCloud Drive.

New Reading Modes:
• Finger reading allows beginning reads to control the speed by running a finger under each word.
• Pac-Man mode. Harvard and MIT developed speed-reading method for everyone to read at 2x speed with no loss of comprehension.
• Sentence mode. Speech pauses at every sentence. Useful for beginning readers.
• Repeat mode.
• Option to rewind to beginning of the last sentence when you pause.

New Voices:
• Alex, free, high-quality voice in iOS 9.
• New premium child voices from Acapela in US, UK, Australian English, US Spanish, and German.
• Acapela's new flagship German voice: Claudia.
• Emotive variations of Jeroen, Antoine, Margaux, Dimitris and Will.

Other New Features:
• Set PDF margins to exclude text in header and footer.
• Up to 4X speed for recorded audio.
• Support for 3D Touch, split-screen multitasking, and Spotlight search.
• Safari extension to save Web pages and Web addresses.
• Evernote file attachments.
• Background download for files and voices.
• More accurate language detection.
• Option to hide header and footer in full-screen mode.

What do you think of Voice Dream Reader?  Share your comments and stories below!

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Comprehensive Remediation for Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia is consistently found to be associated with academic difficulties. As a result, many of these learners require additional help at school or in their community by a qualified professional. Alternative reading instruction is a common approach, but many of these struggling learners require a more comprehensive method. Remedial help needs to focus on strengthening areas of weaknesses, while nurturing abilities and developing compensatory learning strategies. What's more, many of these learners possess both physical and emotional concerns that also require attention.

Cognitive:
There are a number of common cognitive processing areas that require remediation:
  • Visual processing: Dyslexia symptoms can be caused by visual processing problems residing in the brain. These are not problems with vision, rather they are problems with how the brain makes sense of visual stimuli. Therapies for visual processing disorders include cognitive remedial therapy, and some individuals also report that the use of colored paper, tinted lenses and colored overlays as well as vision therapy can help. 
  • Auditory processing: Students with auditory processing deficits can hear normally but struggle to recognize slight differences between sounds in words. In short, their hearing is normal but their brain struggles to process the information accurately. 
  • Language processing: Language processing is the way people process words to extract information, ideas and feelings. 
  • Rapid Automatic Naming (RAN): Rapid automatized naming (RAN) or rapid naming is the ability to quickly verbalize a series of familiar items including letters, numbers, colors or objects. Experts agree that RAN tests suggest a lot about one’s reading abilities.
  • Memory: Many students with dyslexia find that their learning disability as well as anxiety can block recall.  Like finding a favorite shirt in a messy room, a lot of time can be wasted searching for the right word, or even worse, individuals with dyslexia may not be able to demonstrate their knowledge when called upon in class or when recording answers on a test. 
  • Executive functioning/Attention: When individuals with dyslexia struggle with executive functioning, tasks that require planning, organization, memory, time management, attention and flexible thinking become challenging. Executive functioning is like a mental workspace that encodes, retrieves and manipulates information. 
When students in placed in a traditional classroom, these cognitive deficits can lead, in turn, to physical or emotional problems in what can become a destructive feedback spiral.

Emotional:
The repeated association of academics with stress and frustration as well as negative comments from peers, parents or teachers can result in adverse emotional states:
  • Learned helplessness: When students feel that repeated efforts result in failure, many give up and avoid learning altogether.
  • Fear: When academic struggles become associated with adversity, students can experience the 3 Fs. 1) Fight - They will refuse to learn. 2) Flight - They will avoid or even hide their books. 3) Freeze - They seem unable to process what they are learning.
  • Feelings of Inadequacy: When students compare themselves unfavorably to their peers. This can lead to withdrawal, feelings of inadequacy, and a poor academic self-concept.
  • Anger/Frustration: Many individuals with dyslexia feel angry and frustrated when they are misunderstood, bullied or made to feel stupid by their peers or adults.
  • Shame: Some dyslexics feel humiliation or distress caused by poor academic performance.
Physical:
For some struggling learners physical problems can result:
  • Exhaustion: When students with dyslexia use great mental effort to process what they are learning, they often struggle to maintain effort throughout the day and may complain of mental fatigue.
  • Discomfort: With the emotional and cognitive strain and stress that many students with dyslexia feel, their body may tense up and they may experience shortness of breath.
  • Headaches or body pain: Daily strain and distress at school can also manifest in the body as headaches and digestive distress. 
How Can I Help?
It is important to assess and address all the areas of difficulty that each student with dyslexia faces.   Here are a few ideas:

  • Cognitive: As no two students with dyslexia are alike, be sure to use a tailored approach that can meet the unique needs of each individual student.  If you are looking for cognitive remedial tools for dyslexia, there is a great selection of options at Good Sensory Learning.  
  • Emotional: Work with students on coping strategies and help to build self-esteem and resilience through discussion and support.    
  • Physical: Help students manage stress through mindfulness training and meditation.  Also consider using kinesthetic breaks or "brain breaks" to fuel and feed the brain and body with oxygenated blood.  Finally, contemplate using methods like the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) that can be used to address past, negative learning experiences.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Excellent Reading Comprehension: Developing the 3 Core Cognitive Skills


Every teacher would love to ignite a love for reading and nurture voracious readers, but simply teaching your students how to read and asking them to read each night isn't necessarily going to help them comprehend the text that they are scanning.  The key to helping your students get lost in the pages depends on whether they have developed 3 foundational cognitive skills.  

What are There 3 Cognitive Skills?
  1. Automatized Naming (RAN): RAN or rapid naming is the ability to quickly verbalize a series of familiar items including letters, numbers, colors or objects. Research suggests that RAN is much like executive functioning in that it is a control center.  RAN is a complex set of cognitive processing areas - verbal, visual and motor systems - that work together thus defining one’s reading fluency capabilities.
  2. Decoding: Most students are taught in the traditional classroom how to decode. Decoding is the ability to recognize and analyze printed words and to connect it to spoken words. These skills include the ability to recognize the basic sounds and blends that make up words, grasp what words mean, recognize words in context and know whether words are used correctly in sentences.  
  3. Visualization: Research has investigated the effects of visualization on reading capabilities. Studies have shown a direct link between poor comprehension skills and the inability to visualize text. Research also substantiates that students who picture what they are reading, have better comprehension scores and find greater enjoyment in the reading process. What’s more, studies suggest that training in mental imagery helps students generate their own mental images, make inferences and form accurate predictions.  Finally, the research shows that visualization improves deep connections that aid in memory recall and reading comprehension.  

Developing these Skills to Automaticity
Because reading requires multitasking the three core skills in unison, developing these skills to automaticity is a must.  Automaticity is the ability to do things without occupying the mind - allowing it to become an automatic response pattern or habit.  Automaticity is usually the result of learning, repetition, and practice.

How Can I help Students Develop These Skills?
  1. RAN: Games are a motivating option for exercising RAN to automaticity. There are many games that require word retrieval and place time constraints on players. Several rapid naming/word retrieval games are listed below.  Also, don’t be afraid to create your own games!
  1. Decoding: Some students don’t fully pick up decoding when they are exposed to the traditional ways of teaching.  Instead, they may require a more systematic, multisensory approach such as the Orton-Gillingham (OG) approach to reading. There are many successful OG programs on the market today.  The Dyslexia Reading Well offers a comprehensive list.
  2. Visualization:  I have found that the best way to teach visualization is through games and mindful discussions.  Here are a few options:
    • Stare board game
    • Mindful Visualization is a downloadable document (PDF) that provides a review of the research, assessment tools, over twenty game-like activities and lesson suggestions in all the subject areas.
    • Teaching Visualization PowerPoint downloads review the 10 core skills that need to be developed to optimize visualization abilities.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Wednesday, March 23, 2016

New Executive Functioning Game: No Match Penguins



I'm so pleased to announce the release of my new Publication: Executive Functioning Game: No Match Penguin! It is the third of a series of four executive functioning games that I have been creating over the past couple months. My students have been active participants in the creation and testing of this game, and they love it!  

No Match Penguin is the simplest of all the games involves and can be played individually or against an opponent.  This game was created to exercise working memory, attention to detail, stamina, response inhibition, as well as mental shifting and sustained attention. It can be used to exercise core cognitive skills, as a warm-up to integrate the two hemispheres of the brain, and it can also be used as a fun brain break.  It’s great for individuals with ADHD, dyslexia, visual processing issues and executive functioning disorder.  It can also be used with the head injured and the elderly.
Card Descriptions: All 27 cards include a mother and baby penguin that can differ by three accessories: the shape of the mother's hat (tall, medium or short) the color of the babies scarf (red, purple or green), and the babies hat (pompom to the right, middle or left).

Object of the Game:
Players quickly compare their cards one at a time to the card in the discard pile.  Players can only discard cards if their cards has no accessories in common with the card in the discard pile. Players race to be the first to discard all their cards.
Other Activities: If the game is a little difficult for younger players, try these simple sorting activities.
● Sort all the cards by the size of the mother's hat.
● Sort all the cards by the color of the baby's scarf.
● Sort all the cards by the shape of the baby's hat.
● Compare two cards to determine whether there are 0, 1, or 2 matches.
Where Can I Purchase the Game?
The game is presently available @ Good Sensory Learning as a digital download.  Also, a set of all four executive functioning cards games are available on Amazon as decks.  The other three games are Focus, Memory Master, and In or Out.
If you get the games and play them, I would love to hear your thoughts!! So far, I’m hearing rave reviews!
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Thursday, March 17, 2016

Changing Edu-chaos to Aweducation: 8 Awe Inspiring Classroom Ideas

Wouldn't you like to be the teacher that inspires a sense of excitement and wonder in the classroom and creates lessons that put students in a state of awe? While research on awe is quite new, studies conducted by Dacher Keltner at the Greater Good Science Center have shown that experiences that generate a state of awe foster enthusiasm, exuberance and even an overall sense of wellbeing!

How Can We Reach a State of Awe?

When people experience an inspiring video, image or mind-expanding idea or theory, they often feel a sense of "wow" that motivates and opens them up to new perspectives and creative ideas. Keltner reports that awe "makes us feel connected to something larger than ourselves" and explains that this is "a crucial and necessary aspect of purpose." This larger connection can help to foster inspiration, motivation as well as resilience when facing challenges.

By integrating awe into the classroom, teachers can increase attention, involvement and presence. What's more is it can help students find personal meaning in their coursework. An awe experience can expand their minds to new ways of thinking, and help to ignite the passion and drive to make a difference in this world.

What are the Other Benefits of Experiencing a State of Awe?
  • Psychologist, Nicolas Humphrey, reports that there is a "biological advantage of being awestruck." Awe can help us to overcome obstacles, and cultivate excitement about our own existence.
  • Research on awe suggests that this state of mine can elevate cognition and emotion.
  • Stanford University study suggests that awe nurtures compassion, altruism, a general state of wellbeing and even expands one's perception of time.
  • Further Research has found that positive emotions, such as awe, creates a deep connection to art, nature or spirituality and this is linked to lower levels of inflammation in the body.
How Can Teachers Bring Awe into the Classroom?
  1. Seek your own personal awe experiences and share them with your students.
  2. When planning a lesson, think about how you can create a sense of excitement and wonder about upcoming topics. 
  3. Integrate cool and fascinating videos, imagery and stories into lessons.
  4. Find leading professionals, authors, and adventurers that are willing to share their own excitement and awe experiences by video conferencing with your class. 
  5. Allow students to dig deeper into their own interests and encourage them to search of awe-inspiring stories or events that they can share with the class. 
  6. Offer competitions for students to uncover and share awesome facts about the concepts they are learning in class. 
  7. Allow students to share their own obsessions so that you can integrate it into your lessons. For example, if many of your students are into MindCraft, use elements or images from Mindcraft in your math lessons. 
  8. See what's trending in your classroom. For example, if Webkinz are popular, use them to demonstrate lessons, create similar pictures in handouts, and consider offering them as rewards.
Helping students find an awe-inspired path to learning can make teaching itself awesome. Let's help students feel enthusiastic about their lessons and conjure a sense of awe and wonder when learning.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at 
Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn 
and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & 
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Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Free 60-Day Pilot of Nessy Reading



I'm so pleased to offer you an incredible opportunity from my friends at Nessy learning.  Nessy Learning is looking for a few Canadian and U.S. schools interested in participating in a free, Spring 2016 pilot of their Nessy Reading and Spelling program, used in over 10,000 schools worldwide.
  • The pilot targets children with reading disabilities such as dyslexia, and other at-risk readers from K-5 but accommodates all students and abilities.
  • The software utilizes intensive, Orton-Gillingham methods in a fun, multisensory game format.
  • The pilot will run for 60 days - beginning this Spring 2016. 
  • Based on previous pilots, you can expect at least a grade level improvement in reading skill.
  • Nessy Learning provides all software, orientation material, and support material at no cost.
  • The pilot can supplement existing reading remediation programs.
  • Three, 30-minute sessions per week for each student is the recommended commitment.
  • Schools are under no obligation to purchase software at the completion of the pilot.
RSVP to ensure participation.

How to Participate:
Please use this activation code: EW101 and complete this: sign up form 

Who can Participate?

  • Teachers and school administrators 
  • Participating students do not have to be dyslexic or have difficulty reading, although struggling or dyslexic readers will benefit most.  
  • There is no minimum number of students required for participation. 
Purpose of the Pilot:
  • The purpose of the pilot is to improve reading skills (vocabulary, phonemic awareness, spelling, comprehension, fluency) for young, struggling students. Based on previous pilots, you can expect at least a grade level improvement for participating students.
  • Data collected from the pilot can be utilized in student evaluation (report cards) and planning (IEPs). 
  • Nessy will use the data from the pilot to improve and enhance the next version of the software.
Note that Nessy Reading has already undergone extensive testing.

Technical Requirements:
  • Windows - PC or Apple - Macintosh desktop
  • Broadband internet connection
  • Latest version of Firefox or Chrome browser recommended
  • Full tablet accessibility with Puffin browser
Nessy's Role:
Dedicated Nessy staff will work with your school for the duration of the pilot. They will:
  • Provide orientation material.
  • Assist in the installation of the Nessy browser and software.
  • Provide technical support.
  • Address any issues arising including any questions.
  • Conclude the pilot early for any reason.
Your School's Role in the Pilot:
Nessy will make every effort to limit any administrative burden.  Each school must identify a person who will work with Nessy. Their role includes:
  • Reviewing orientation material.
  • Viewing a pre-recorded webinar.     
  • Installing the Nessy browser and software.
  • Having all participating students begin with the Nessy assessment.
  • Allocating three, 30 minutes weekly sessions per student for the pilot duration.
Beyond the Pilot:
  • Progress reports data will be available to school staff at every stage of the pilot.
  • Your school will have the option of continuing to use Nessy by purchasing licenses at a steep discount compared to retail rates. 
Please use this activation code: EW101 and complete this: sign up form  





Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Friday, March 4, 2016

5 Paragraph Essay Freebie

Many learners struggle to master the five paragraph essay.  When I work with students on an individualized basis, I'm continually teaching this concept.  As a result, I created a free Prezi for my students and other professionals, parents and teachers that want to help students master the formula behind writing a 5 paragraph essay.  Students can also use this as a reference each time they are assigned a new essay.  In addition, because many teachers have their own variations or tweak to the 5 paragraph essay, students can show the Prezi to the teachers and make any needed alterations.

I'd love to hear your thoughts!!

CLICK HERE  for free access.
 
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Free Following Directions Sample Activities


Many young learners struggle with the complexities of linguistic cues and following both written and oral directions can be a challenge.  This requires vocabulary development as well as the strengthening of cognitive processing areas such as auditory processing, visual processing, sequencing and more.  Come download free sample activities that you can use to help your students strengthen these needed skills.


Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com, & www.learningtolearn.biz