01 09 10

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Rapid Automatic Naming Impacts Reading: Memory Strategies and Games Help

What is Rapid Automatic Naming?
Rapid automatic naming (RAN) or rapid naming is the ability to quickly verbalize a series of familiar items including letters, numbers, colors or things. Research purports that RAN tests are highly correlated to one’s reading abilities because the faster and more efficiently one can access information from the memory banks, the easier it is to read and comprehend text.

How Does Rapid Automatic Naming Happen in the Brain?

Although we know RAN impacts reading, there are three competing viewpoints in the literature. One view indicates that RAN involves how well one can retrieve phonological information and then verbalize a response. The difficulties lie in the brain’s ability to process sounds into language. Another theory indicates that RAN is a “complex set of cognitive processing” areas that work together in concert thus defining one’s reading fluency capabilities. This perspective further suggests that individuals with RAN and phonemic awareness difficulties have a “double deficit.” These individuals are believed to exhibit the most severe reading problems and tend to be the most difficult to remediate. Finally, there are those studies that suggest that struggling readers have an overarching processing speed deficit. They report that slow processing of sounds diminishes the ability to discriminate between phonemes and that this language learning problem likely causes dyslexia.

What Can Be Done to Improve Rapid Automatic Naming?

I have two primary recommendations.  On the one hand, you should teach those that struggle with RAN memory strategies.  Using methods like mnemonics, method of loci, visualization or hooking can assist the brain's ability to recall information.  On the other hand, you should play games that exercise recall.  Games are a motivating option for strengthening RAN.  There are many games that require word retrieval and they place time constraints on players too. Several rapid naming/word retrieval games are listed below. Also, don’t be afraid to create your own games!
If you found this blog helpful, I offer a monthly newsletter that features my current projects and publications, freebies, sales at Good Sensory Learning and my Amazon store, a summary of my most recent blogs and more, CLICK HERE. What's more, I will be creating an online support platform and course for creating successful learning specialist and educational therapist practices. If you want to be kept abreast of this project, be sure to sign up for my project newsletter that will be offering freebies and unique opportunities: CLICK HERE https://app.convertkit.com/landing_pages/69465
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Scrible: Amazing Annotating Writing Tool for Dyslexic and Struggling Writers

Like a complex braid, great writers weave and multitask with sentence rules, spelling, idea formation, content organization and more. And when learners struggle with one or more of these processes, writing can become a frustrating tangle of ideas, an apparent, impossible knot to unsnarl. Research papers can be particularly tricky, because students also have the added obstacles to collect relevant articles, organize the information into a structured layout, paraphrase and manage citations.

This week, I am so excited to share with you an assistive technology video blog with Victor Karkar, the CEO of Scrible. Scrible is an amazing online tool that students can use to annotate and color-code online text and simplify the process of writing research papers. This extraordinary technology, that is recognized by the National Science Foundation, can help students to read and write more efficiently. What's more, it offers a step by step process that can be monitored and supported by teachers and parents. Scrible offers single click citations, bibliographies, color coding, sharing, as well as organizing and annotating features. To top it off, it integrates with Google Drive, offers a free Google docs Add-on and can sync with Google Classroom for individualized student analytics. They offer a free plan, but I highly recommend upgrading to the Education Pro Plan at only $10.00 a year for grade school and $28.00 a year for higher education. It’s well worth all the added features.

Come watch my video blog with Victor, so that you too can be blown away by this technology that can help all students become confident writers.


**Click Below to SUBSCRIBE for More Videos:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCClFDLZtuJD99TBMGxb-ekw?sub_confirmation=1

I offer a monthly newsletter that features my current projects and publications, freebies, sales at Good Sensory Learning and my Amazon store, a summary of my most recent blogs and more. Click Here! What's more, I will be creating an online support platform and course for creating successful learning specialist and educational therapist practices. If you want to be kept abreast of this project, be sure to sign up for my project newsletter that will be offering freebies and unique opportunities. Click Here!

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Online Academic Support Services: A New Option for Struggling Students


Would you please take two minutes to fill out our very brief but important questionnaire about how to choose an online academic support service!

            Click here to take the survey now!

After years of tinkering with various ways to offer online remedial sessions and academic support services, we’ve finally reached a point where we don’t have to sacrifice quality for access. With all the new platforms and tools to communicate online (e.g., Skype, Zoom, Google Chat), assistive technologies, browser add-ons, and the faster Internet connections, learning specialists can finally provide high-quality sessions to their students (and parents and trainees!).

This development has become especially important to those of us in rural areas where there are little to no resources.

Yet, it still begs the question: What is the best way to choose an online service? What technology tools do I need to provide my child? How is an online session different from a live session?

These and other questions will be answered in an upcoming webinar conducted by Dr. Erica Warren and Dr. Michael Hart.

First, though, in order to help us best prepare to support you, we’d like to ask for two minutes of your time so we can learn more about your thoughts and your questions on this topic. Please fill out the following survey so we can make sure that we are giving you the information you need!

            Click here to take the survey now!



Dr. Michael Hart
Michael Hart, Ph.D. is a child psychologist with 25 years of experience in the diagnostic assessment and treatment of a full range of learning differences, including dyslexia and (AD/HD). He is the founder/owner of www.drmichaelhart.com and is currently providing webinars, online courses and onsite presentations/training for parents regarding the proper educational care of our dyslexic students.

       
Dr. Erica Warren
Dr. Erica Warren Ed.D. is an educational therapist with 18 years of experience in individualized remediation, multisensory teaching, diagnostic evaluations, advocacy, teacher education and the designing of remedial materials.  She is the founder of LearningtoLearn
GoodSensoryLearning and



Thanks so much for your time and assistance.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Dyslexia and Juvenile Delinquency: A Path of Ashes

It is not uncommon to hear about all the high achievers and entrepreneurs with dyslexia, but did you know that there is also a disproportional number of juvenile offenders and criminals with this learning disability? Although it is true that some individuals with dyslexia are able to succeed in life despite their learning disability, unfortunately, many more have tragic stories to tell.  In fact, the United States Department of Education reported that 60 percent of American inmates are illiterate and 85 percent of all juvenile offenders have reading problems.  In New Zealand, an estimated 10% of the population is dyslexic, yet percentages climb as high as 90% in their prisons.
_____________________________
This week, I’m going to tell you the story of Ash Cousins.  Ash has dyslexia, and when he was an adolescent, he followed a path of crime.  It was a choice that had a tragic outcome, and Ash asked me to share his story, because he wants to do all that he can to assure that others don’t make the same mistake.

Ash's Story
At the age of 15, Ash was going through a troubling time.  He had rented an apartment due to a stressful situation in his family's home, and he had stopped going to school because his academic needs were not being addressed.  One night he was kicking back in his flat and drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana with a friend.  Soon, another chum dropped by and coaxed the two of them into joining him for a joy ride in a stolen car. At breakneck speed, the driver whipped the car around tight bends and recklessly accelerated down the roadways. The car began to swerve and skid and in a split second, the vehicle plunged off the road and crashed into a tree. Ash was not wearing a seatbelt and the impact resulted in a 3-month coma and a life-changing head injury.  He was the unlucky one, as the other two walked away without a bruise.

With the support of his family, extensive rehabilitation, as well as a lot of hard work and determination, Ash pulled through. Although he was unable to speak or walk, Ash learned to use an electric wheelchair as well as text to voice assistive technology. Eventually, he moved out of the rehabilitation center and rented his own apartment.

A message from Ash:
“Just because I’m in a wheelchair and talk through a computer, I'm no different from anybody else.  If anything, I'm more of a person, because I have turned a negative experience into a positive message.  So, I am OK with my life now.  I have good and bad days, but I am mostly happy.  

Just remember to really think! Think about who you get in the car with and always keep the seat belt on.  By helping people avoid the same mistake I made, my life has found a whole new meaning.”

This video can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdgjP0b2PGQ  Please be sure to follow this link and "Like" Ash's YouTube video! Also, share it across social media, so we can help Ash save lives!
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

List of Reasonable Accommodations and Modifications for Students with Learning Disabilities

Accommodations vs. Modifications?
The United States clumps accommodations and modifications under the term reasonable accommodations, but other countries, such as Canada make a distinction between the two. An accommodation describes an alteration of the environment, curriculum format, or equipment that allows an individual with a disability to gain access to content and/or complete assigned tasks. Since accommodations do not alter what is being taught, instructors should be able to implement the same grading scale.  Some examples of accommodations include: preferential seating, audiobooks, and speech to text technology. A modification describes a change in the curriculum. Modifications are made for students with disabilities who are unable to comprehend the content. For example, assignments might be simplified, or a student might receive a foreign language exemption. Some reasonable accommodations are difficult to discriminate and teeter between an accommodation and modification. For example, small group or individualized instruction could be an accommodation or a modification. It all depends on whether the expectations or curriculum is modified.

Who can Initiate Reasonable Accommodations?
Any student with a qualified disability or their legal guardian/parent can request a meeting that can result in reasonable accommodations. Please note that the disability must be documented by the school or an outside source and the results must be presented at the meeting.

What are Some Common Reasonable Accommodations?
Here is a list of general options. However, it will be your school's special education committee that decides which options will provide the necessary accommodations.


Difficulty
Accommodations/Modifications
Overall Teaching Techniques
  • Provide a consistent daily routine.
  • Make sure documents are well organized and are not too visually dense.
  • Preview new topics and review the vocabulary.
  • Review old topics to assure the retention of knowledge.
  • Use small group or one-to-one instruction.
  • Break projects into organized, activities with clear expectations and deadlines.
  • Offer reminders to write down and turn in assignments.
  • Offer modified in-class and homework assignments.
  • Provide extended time for homework assignments.
  • Provide a list of homework assignments that is accessible to the student as well as the parents.
  • Provide a foreign language substitution, waiver or exemption.
Reading/
Listening
  • Provide audiobooks through organizations such as RaziKids, Learning Alley or Bookshare.
  • Provide a picture of directions and schedules.
  • Provide extra time when reading.
  • Shorten reading assignments.
  • Simplify directions and highlight keywords.
  • Provide oral directions, check for understanding, and repeat directions - if needed.
  • Offer a larger font with less content on each page.
  • Provide text to speech and technology.
Spelling
  • Supply the use of a computer with a spell check or a hand-held spell check.
  • Offer no penalty for incorrect spelling on classroom writing and tests.
Writing
  • Supply a copy of the teacher’s or another student’s notes or provide notes with a few blanks for students to fill in.
  • Shorten writing assignments.
  • Offer a scribe for classroom writing assignments and testing situations.
  • Allow the use a tape recorder or a Smart Pen.
  • Provide a computer for written assignments and tests.
  • Provide assistive technology such as speech to text, word prediction, spell checkers and grammar checkers.
Math
  • Allow the use of graph paper for lining up math problems.
  • Read word problems aloud and assist with tricky wording.
Test-taking
  • Grant time and a half or double testing time.
  • Offer testing in a distraction-free location.
  • Avoid scantrons and allow the student to write directly on the test.
  • Allow the student to write directly on the test and avoid scantrons.
  • Simplify and reword questions on language loaded tests.
  • Provide short breaks when needed.
  • Permit the use of a calculator during testing.

I also offer a monthly newsletter that features my current projects and publications, freebies, sales at Good Sensory Learning and my Amazon store, a summary of my most recent blogs and more, CLICK HERE. What's more, I will be creating an online support platform and course for creating successful learning specialist and educational therapist practices. If you want to be kept abreast of this project, be sure to sign up for my project newsletter that will be offering freebies and unique opportunities: CLICK HERE https://app.convertkit.com/landing_pages/69465
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin