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Monday, December 30, 2013

Literary Devices: Free Handout and Link to New Publication


What’s the Confusion all About?
Over the years, my students have come to sessions seeking help with literary devices.  They have expressed confusion over the terms: literary devices, literary terms, literary elements and figurative language, and they also struggle with the many definitions. 

What are Literary Devices, Literary Terms, Literary Elements and Figurative Language?
  • Literary Devices are creative writing strategies used by an author to convey his or her message(s).  When used well, literary devices help readers to visualize, interpret and analyze literary texts.  There are two kinds: literary techniques (which includes figurative language) and literary elements. 
  • Literary Techniques are words or phrases in texts of literature that writers use to achieve artistic or creative expression.  Literary techniques also help readers to visualize, understand and appreciate literature.  
  • Literary Elements are components or pieces that make up a story or literary work. 
  • Figurative Language is the creative use of words and phrases that offers a hidden meaning beyond any literal interpretation.
How Can Students Understand the Global Concept?
I created an image to help students “see” the big picture as well as understand the individual components.  Although I have not included all possible literary devices, I have included what I believe to be the most common ones.  I hope you agree. 


Click Here to download a free copy of this image.

Additional Resources:
If you are also interested in a comprehensive publication that also offers students additional printables, a multisensory activity and a game, Click Here
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Friday, December 20, 2013

Multisensory Teaching Accommodates the 12 Ways of Learning

To be a true multisensory teacher, it is important to be aware of all 12 Ways of Learning. The Eclectic Teaching Approach merges the theories of cognitive styles, multiple intelligences, information processing, and multisensory learning to reveal 12 diverse and distinctive ways of processing and encoding information. Each of these learning modalities lie on a continuum and individuals have their own profiles that are based on cognitive strengths, preferences as well as exposure to each methodology. By learning about the Eclectic Teaching Approach, teachers, therapists, parents and even employers can be more mindful of their expectations as well as their lesson or training approach. Then, by evaluating preferences, instruction and assignments can be tailored for groups or individuals resulting in optimal learning.

What are the 12 Ways of Learning?
If you would like to view a FREE Prezi on the 12 Ways of Learning, Click here.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Saturday, December 14, 2013

The Number Ladder: Turning Addition and Subtraction from Top to Bottom


I have never understood why the number-line extends horizontally from left to right.  Young learners often confuse their left from right and others have trouble remembering which way to travel when trying to solve simple addition and subtraction problems.  However, when viewing a vertical number-line, it makes conceptual sense that going up would equate with adding, while traveling down would result in subtraction.  Furthermore, when solving multi-digit problems, we teach students to line up numbers vertically.  Therefore wouldn't it be best to commence instruction with the number-line extending up-and-down?

Turning the Number-line Into a Ladder
To make the learning process even easier, I like to change the number line into a ladder that travels up into the sky.  This way, when students are instructed to add, they climb up the ladder and when they subtract they descend down the ladder.  What's more, when students eventually learn about integers, the number line can descend down "into the ground."

Free Game that Teaches this Concept:  
I love to use a staircase to help students really understand the concept of adding and subtracting. If you would like a free game that is ideal for kinesthetic learners as well as a copy of my Number Ladder, Click here

I Also Offer Two Publications:


  • If you want to purchase an interactive PowerPoint that teaches adding and subtracting whole numbers as well as a PDF file with activities and games, Click here.  
  • If you would like to purchase an interactive PowerPoint as well as a PDF that teaches all about adding and subtracting integers and also offers two games click on the image to the right or Click here
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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Saturday, December 7, 2013

More Games that Benefit the Brain: A Review



If you have been reading my blogs, you know I'm a big fan of bringing the fun factor into learning.  In fact, did you know there are many games that can improve cognitive functioning?  Kids love to play card and board games, and there are quite a few that exercise and strengthen the brain. Back in September I reviewed 18 games that can benefit cognition and I wanted to add a few more to the list:


Game:
Cognitive Benefits
Where to Purchase
Rat-A-Tat-Cat:

· Visual Processing
· Visual Memory
· Planning
· Attention
· Working Memory


Q-Bits – Extreme:

· Visual Processing
· Spatial Relations
· Speed of Processing
· Attention to Detail
· Mental Flexibility
· Executive Functioning
· Perceptual Reasoning




The Main I-deer:

· Simultaneous Processing
· Linguistic Skills
· Categorizing
· Verbal Reasoning
· Attention



Grammar Games Galore:

· Linguistic Skills
· Categorizing
· Processing Speed
· Verbal Reasoning


Duple:

· Visual Processing
· Word Finding
· Processing Speed
· Hemisphere Integration
· Attention to Details
· Attention



Stare:
· Visual Memory
· Speed of Processing
· Metacognitive Skills
· Attention to Details


Color Code:
· Visual Processing
· Nonverbal Reasoning
· Spatial Relations
· Planning
· Perceptual Reasoning



No Speed Limit:
· Processing Speed
· Visual Processing
· Visual Memory
· Executive Functioning
· Perceptual Reasoning



Qwitch:
· Mental Flexibility
· Sequential Processing
· Speed of Processing
· Working Memory
· Hemisphere Integration



Anomia:
· Word Finding
· Processing Speed
· Hemisphere Integration
· Attention to Details


5 Ws Detectives
· Word Finding
· Processing Speed
· Written Language
· Attention to Details


Speedabee:
· Word Finding
· Speed of Processing
· Mental Flexibility
· Listening Skills
· Auditory Processing
· Verbal Reasoning





I hope you found this helpful.  Remember I also reviewed 18 other games in a prior post.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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