01 09 10

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Audiobooks Can Improve Word Recognition, Pronunciation and Visualization Abilities

Did you know that audiobooks or books on tape can improve word recognition, the proper pronunciation of words and also develop visualization abilities?  Passive learners may not obtain these perks, but with guided instruction on active and mindful reading, these benefits can be easily attainable.

How Can Students Reap The Benefits of Audiobooks?
For young learners to get the most out of audiobooks, they must learn to be active participants in the reading process.  They can take one of two roles.

1) Students should follow along with the text as they listen to the book:
  • If students read the text while listening to the book, they can begin to recognize whole words.  Instead of decoding or sounding out the words, the audiobook does this for them, and they can just focus on tracking the words across the page.  
  • An added plus to scanning the text while listening is students will quickly learn the proper pronunciations of sight words and other tricky words such as "chaos," and "deoxyribonucleic acid."  In fact, for many students they experience improvements in spelling too as they pair the proper pronunciation with the visual of the word.  
2) Students should close their eyes while listening to the audiobook and make a conscious effort to visualize the setting, characters and plot.  Learning to create a movie in one's head improves attention and will also make the process more fun and memorable.  Understand that many students that struggle with reading do not fully develop their abilities to visualize, and they may need instruction and practice with this needed skill.  If you would like to help your students to develop this ability consider purchasing Mindful Visualization for Education.

Where Can I Get Affordable Options for Audiobooks?
There are a number of sites online that offer audiobooks.  If I child has a learning disability, they can qualify to receive audiobooks through their school or learning specialist from sites such as Learning Ally and BookShare.  Furthermore, here is a website that offers 224 Places for Free Audio Books.  Below you will see a list of just a few of them:
  1. Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/
  2. Audible: http://www.audible.com/
  3. Open Culture: http://www.openculture.com/freeaudiobooks
  4. Free Classic Audiobooks: http://freeclassicaudiobooks.com/
  5. Books Should be Free: http://www.booksshouldbefree.com/
  6. LibriVox: https://librivox.org/
By helping young learners to actively use audiobooks, they can improve their reading abilities and find more joy in the process.
 
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin

Friday, July 18, 2014

The Best Reading Remediation: Tackling the 3 Core Cognitive Skills


There are a plethora of reading programs that walk students through the rules, patterns and irregularities of our complicated English language, however, many students need to begin their remedial instruction by strengthening the core and foundational cognitive skills required to be a competent reader.

What Are the Core Cognitive Skills Required for Reading?
There are three main cognitive skills that students must strengthen to prepare them to read. Although there are other cognitive processing areas that the brain uses to read, such as executive functioning, spatial skills, and processing speed, here is a list and discussion of the primary ones:

1) Visual Processing: ability to scan and make sense of visual information and symbols.
Within the realm of visual processing are the following:
  • Visual Sequencing: ability to process visual information in a series or sequence.  Example: Accurately processing and comprehending a sequence of letters.
  • Visual Closure: ability to discern visual information when part of the image is missing.  Example: Accurately processing and comprehending a poorly copied page.
  • Visual Synthesis: ability to combine individual pieces of visual information into a comprehensible whole.  Example: Combining individual letters into a word.
  • Visual Discrimination: ability to distinguish similarities and differences in size, shape, pattern, form, position, and color.  Example: Telling the difference between letters and numbers that are similar in shape.
  • Visual Memory: ability to remember what is seen.  Example: Being able to recall what sight words look like.
  • Tracking: ability to accurately follow an object or words across the page.  Example: Reading words across a page and also from line to line.
2) Auditory Processing: ability to process and understand what is heard.  Because students "say the words in their heads" and also sounds blend together to make words, auditory processing is utilized while reading.  Within the realm of auditory processing are the following: 
  • Auditory Sequencing: ability to recall a series or sequence that is heard.  Example: Accurately processing and comprehending a sequence of sounds.   
  • Auditory Closure: ability to discern auditory information when part of the sounds or phonemes are missing.  Example: Accurately processing and comprehending someone that does not speak the English language proficiently - leaving out sounds.
  • Auditory Synthesis: ability to combine individual pieces of auditory information into a comprehensible whole.  Example: Blending sounds into words.
  • Auditory Discrimination: ability to detect differences in sounds.  Example: Telling the difference between similar sounds such as the short sounds of the letters "a" and "e."
  • Auditory Memory: ability to process, analyze and recall orally presented information.  Example: Being able to recall what sight words sound like.
3) Verbal Reasoning: ability to understand and reason with words.   
  • Higher Order Language:  ability to summarize information, make inferences, understand multiple meanings, comprehend non-literal meanings, glean the main idea and predict outcomes.   
  • Reading Comprehension:  Ability to understand what is read.  
How Can We Strengthen These Foundational Cognitive Skills?


Following Directions Primary:
Following Directions Primary, offers a 49-page download that includes coloring activities and process of elimination activities.  Cute animals and aliens as well as numbers, letters, shapes, and arrows are used to develop listening skills, linguistic abilities and the core cognitive skills needed for reading.  If you are interested in learning more about this publication and would like to download free activities click here.

Reversing Reversals Primary:
Reversing Reversals Primary strengthens the foundational cognitive skills needed for reading and math.  It also develops visual perception such as reversals that impacts students with dyslexia.  This publication is available as a download, and it offers 72 pages of activities as well as a game.  If you would like to learn more about this publication and also get free activities click here.  

By helping young learners to develop their core foundation before beginning reading instruction, you can assure that students will have the needed abilities and tools to succeed.  
 
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Mastering Tricky Wording: Free Follow Directions Summer Fun Activities

 Following Directions Activities
It's easy to forget how challenging it can be for children to learn the complexities of the English language. Following a parents' directives, interpreting the needed steps to complete a homework assignment, understanding multiple choice test questions, and discerning a teacher's instructions are just a few examples of how young learners need to be able to understand and navigate the subtleties of linguistic cues. For many children, learning to follow directions is a complex task that requires instruction, and the mastery of this skill involves vocabulary development, mental flexibility, attention to details, listening skills, receptive language skills, and verbal reasoning.

What Happens When Kids Have Trouble Following Directions?
When kids have trouble following directions, they often encounter the annoyance and frustration of others. In fact, a true misunderstanding can even result in ridicule and punishments that can leave the child confused and dejected.

How Can We Teach This Needed Skill in a Positive Way?
The two most important things to do is to be patient and to make the process fun and engaging. Playing games like "Simon Says," or creating a scavenger hunt can help to teach this needed skill, but finding the time to do this can be difficult. However, if you would like to develop this skill through printable, game-like handouts or workbooks, I am offering free samples of my Following Directions: The Fun and Easy Way publications. Just click here to learn more about this publication.

I hope you found this post, ideas, and materials helpful. If you have any thoughts or further ideas, please share them below this post.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/, www.goodsensorylearning.com, www.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz
Follow on Bloglovin


Friday, July 4, 2014

10 Ways to Motivate and Empower Struggling Readers

Making the reading process fun over the summer months can transform an apparent chore into an enjoyable activity that young learners can relish.  One can make the reading process pleasurable by integrating engaging activities, creating a fun reading environment, teaching kids how to visualize, pairing the activities with pleasantries, sharing the process with them and integrating technology such as books on tape.

What Are Some Specific Strategies?
  1. Be positive and excited about your own reading time.  If kids see that you love it, they will want to do it too.
  2. Help your children learn to visualize or imagine pictures when reading or listening to text. While reading together, talk about your own visuals and ask them about theirs.  Creating a movie in your head improves reading comprehension, attention and will help kids picture the characters and settings.
  3. Create an exciting and comfortable niche for your children to read.  With your child or children collect pillows, blankets, stuffed animals and other items that create a relaxing, comfortable and fun environment for reading.
  4. Allow kids to listen to books on tape while reading along.  This will improve sight word vocabulary and listening skills.
  5. Make your child's favorite snacks and drinks available during reading time.  This will provide positive associations with the reading process.
  6. Create a family time a few days a week, where the whole family reads to themselves or as a group.
  7. Go to the library or bookstore and help your children select reading materials that they find engaging.  This could be a book, magazine, comic and more.
  8. Integrate activities that your children enjoy into the reading process.  For example, if they love to draw, encourage them to illustrate a scene out of each chapter that they read.  
  9. Read the book with your child so that you can talk about each chapter.  You can even make it into a game.  See how many character, setting and plot details you can each remember from your reading. 
  10. When kids self-initiate reading, be sure to praise them and celebrate their self-directed accomplishments.
I hope you found these strategies helpful.  If you have any other ideas, please share them!
 
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
Follow on Bloglovin
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...