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Wednesday, May 15, 2013

11 End of the Year Activities Using Balls and Balloons


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Balls and balloons offer a cheap and fun way to complete your school year. What’s more integrating balls and balloons brings a tactile, playful, and kinesthetic modality into the classroom. Balls and balloons can be used to review the academic content, as well as mindfulness activities and keepsakes. Below is featured a variety of entertaining, multisensory ideas.

Reviewing Key Topics from the School Year
These games can be played with an entire class in a large circle facing one another, or you can break the students into small groups or pairs.

1) Parts of Speech Game: Place the parts of speech on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another. Instruct them to say aloud the first part of speech they see. Then ask them to provide a word that is an example of that part of speech. Players can not repeat a word that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

2) Figurative Language Game: Place the figurative language terms on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first figurative language term they see. Then ask them to provide a phrase that is an example of that type of figurative language. Players can not repeat a figurative language example that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

3) Types of Syllables Game:
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Place the syllable types on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first syllable type that they see. Then ask them to provide a word that is an example of that type of syllable. Players can not repeat a word that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

4) Vowel Combinations or Vowel Teams Game:
Place the vowel combinations on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first vowel combination that they see. Then ask them to provide a word that uses that vowel combination. Players can not repeat an example that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

5) Types of Sentences: Place the types of sentences on a balloon or ball. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the first sentence type that they see. Then ask them to provide a sentence that illustrates that sentence type. Players can not repeat a sentence that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

6) Main Ideas and Details: Place main ideas on a balloon or ball. Main ideas could include transportation, colors, vacation spots and so forth. Have the students pass the balloon or ball to one another, and instruct them to say aloud the main idea that they see. Then ask them to provide a detail that would be properly categorized under that main idea. Players can not repeat a detail that has already been used. If they do, they are out of the game.

7) What I Learned: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your students and ask them to share the most important thing they learned over the school year. When they are finished talking, have them toss the ball to another student. Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their thoughts.

8) My Favorite Lessons: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your students and ask them to share their favorite lesson from the whole school year. Ask them to also share why they like it so much. When they are finished talking, have them toss the ball to another student. Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their thoughts.

9) What I Like About Me and You: Have the students sit in a circle facing one another. Explain that the only person who can speak is the one holding the ball. Toss the ball to one of your students and ask them to share one thing that they like about themselves and one thing that they like about the person who tossed them the ball. When they are finished talking, have them toss the ball to another student. Continue until all the students have an opportunity to share their thoughts.

10) Memory Balls: Give each student a blank inflatable ball, such as a beach ball. Provide permanent markers and let the students go around and sign each other’s balls. They can leave short messages too. Be sure to say that all messages must be positive.

11) Why I’m “Special” Balls: Before you begin this activity, ask your students to help you create a list of positive adjectives that can describe people. Place this list where all the students can see it. Now, give each of your students a blank beach ball or balloon. Provide permanent markers and have the students go around and write a positive adjective that describes the person on the ball or balloon to whom it belongs. Encourage the students to come up with unique adjectives by looking at each ball and coming up with something new.

If you would like to learn about some of my other popular games. Go to: http://goodsensorylearning.com There, you can even download freebies on some of my product pages.

I hope you enjoy these games!! I would love to hear you thoughts.
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials.  She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY.  To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz  
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