01 09 10

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Dyslexia and Memory

This blog shares my most recent video podcast, featuring memory and language expert, Aaron Ralby. It is the sixth of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!

This was such an eye opening conversation for me, and I can’t wait to take Aaron’s memory course and integrate these methods into my own life and practice. During the video podcast, Aaron and I discussed memory strategies that can assist individuals with dyslexia learn and master math, reading, languages, word finding, spelling and more. It’s a fascinating discussion that will get you excited about the ways that cognition can be enhanced with strategies that work for individuals with dyslexia. Come learn about fun and memorable memory palaces and a new virtual reality program that can help individuals with dyslexia.

What is Linguisticator?
Linguisticator is an online course platform that offers memory and language training. These courses provide systematic, step-by-step guidance on how to use spatial memory techniques to learn large and complex subjects with incredible speed and full retention. Through extensive research into languages, memory, and learning methodologies, Linguisticator distills and maps out subjects while providing solutions for a range of individuals, from children with dyslexia to high school students preparing for final exams and even adults looking for professional language training.

Click the image below to watch our Video Podcast on YouTube:


Useful links: 
I hope you found this post helpful.  Please share and like the video, and let me know what you think!!

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz

Learning Specialist VIP
Learning_(1)
Dr. Warren's learning specialist VIP list offers freebies, advice and more.
We won't send spam or share your emailPowered by ConvertKit
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

What's the Difference Between Educational Psychology and Educational Therapy?

There seems to be a logical assumption that if you get a degree in educational psychology that this would enable you to be an educational therapist. As with many assumptions, this is partially true, but not fully accurate.

What is Educational Psychology?

Educational psychology is an established branch of psychology that can be traced back to the early 1900s, and many formal institutions of higher education offer advanced degrees in this field of study. educational psychologists study human learning and motivation, and they investigate the
  • cognition of the brain
  • influence of affect, goals, and interest on learning
  • role of assessment in learning
  • psychology of teaching
  • effectiveness of instructional intervention
  • relationship between cognition and technology
  • social psychology of learning organizations
  • methods for conducting educational research
These programs offer instruction on how people use emotional, social, and cognitive processes to learn and retain knowledge. They focus on theory and research more so than direct instruction, and areas of focus might include teaching methods, testing techniques, classroom environments, as well as the learning, social, and behavioral problems that interfere with learning.

What Does an Educational Psychologist Do?

Many educational psychologists conduct educational research and studies on current and educational practices, while others may try to develop new and improved teaching techniques, testing methods, learning methods and educational programs. Some example resources an educational psychologist might author include worksheets, lesson plans, tests, textbooks, and instructional videos.

Many educational psychologists have specialties. They may concentrate on a specific age group ranging from elementary to adult learners. It is also common for an educational psychologist to focus on a particular type of learning problem or disability, such as dysgraphia or dyslexia.

What is Educational Therapy?

Educational therapy is new term, and this is why there are few if any formal educational programs actively using this method. The term learning specialist has been around for a longer period of time and the two approaches are virtually the same. Educational therapy is a form of remedial treatment used to help individuals with learning differences, disabilities, and challenges. These professionals are versed in helping students with social and emotional challenges surrounding their learning difficulties. These interventions are individualized and unique to the specific learner. Most educational therapists combine degrees in both education and psychology. Training methods are also available through online courses of study.

What Does and Educational Therapist Do? 

An educational therapist combines educational and therapeutic approaches for evaluation, remediation, case management, and advocacy on behalf of children, adolescents, and adults with learning disabilities or learning problems.

Final Thought:

I am an educational therapist and I feel that my Master’s degree in educational psychology was an integral piece of my training. However, I also have another six years of doctoral study in a combination of school psychology, special education and adult education. These, too, were significantly relevant, but two other extremely important aspects of my training were my BA in fine arts (what I like to refer to as my secret weapon) and a three-year assistantship where I conducted psycho-educational testing and wrote comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. So although direct training is educational therapy methods is limited, there are many pathways that can lead to the knowledge needed to be an educational therapist.

If you would like to learn the distinction between an educational therapist, learning specialist and a tutor: http://learningspecialistmaterials.blogspot.com/2016/01/tutor-learning-specialist-and.html
Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz

Learning Specialist VIP

Learning_(1)
Dr. Warren's learning specialist VIP list offers freebies, advice and more.
We won't send spam or share your emailPowered by ConvertKit
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Do Learning Styles Exist?


I think everyone will agree that no two people have the same strengths and weaknesses. But because we cannot observe each student’s brain behavior, it’s easy to blindly assume that what helps us learn, will help others. In fact, you will often see teachers insist that their students study a certain way, because the teacher knows how much that methods helps themselves. So should teachers step out of their preferred ways of learning and accommodate the unique needs of their students?

What are Learning Styles?
Learning styles are an individual's unique approach to learning based on strengths, weaknesses, and preferences. Over the past decade there has been a debate about whether teachers should accommodate learning styles in the classroom. Some even purport that learning styles don’t exist altogether. I have been working with children and adults as an educational therapist for over twenty years, and I can assure you that everyone has their own unique ways of processing information and we each have our own particular pattern of cognitive processing strengths and weaknesses that impact how we learn.

Learning Styles Have a Bad Rap
But accommodating "learning styles" is refuted by research. This is largely because past, popular assessments were inadequate and terribly limiting. In addition, many implied that “learning styles” are fixed and faulty inventories limited learning styles to sensory input. Furthermore, assessments have mistakenly forced participants, for example, to choose between visual or auditory modalities. Therefore, instruction has mistakenly focused on teaching to a specific way of learning. But it’s not "black or white." Instead, there is a vast, colorful continuum and each of us lies somewhere on that range of aptitude for each way of learning. But it is not static either. Rather, it's fluid, and the brain is forever changing. So instead, one might visualize a shifting abacus or virtual equalizer to represent each student’s ways of learning, because our brains offer an extremely complex, thoroughfare, of potential highways and byways that are continually under construction. The other thing to note is that each of us have comfortable ways of learning. One can think of it as a familiar path. But the true benefits lie in knowing and using multiple pathways to learning so that knowledge is comprehensive and fully encoded.

Do We Learn Specific Ways?
So as long as our senses or brains are not damaged, we are able to process in all ways. But remarkably, even those with "broken" sensory inputs or head injuries can compensate. Other senses and parts of the brain become more acute and we are now learning, for example, that even a blind person can utilize their visual cortex and sound to create mental imagery or a "map" of their surroundings.

Should we Dismiss Learning Styles?
So because we have not fully understood the complexities of learning styles, we shouldn’t simply dismiss the concept altogether. Instead, we should accommodate the many ways that we can process information by 1) sharing with students their infinite capacity and the plastic nature of the brain (this creates hope). 2) honoring each individual's comfortable ways of processing (this creates connection). 3) introducing students to other ways of processing so that they can learn to blaze new neural pathways in the brain (this creates resilience and flexibility).

Should Students Learn to Step Out of Their Comfortable Ways of Learning?
Many learners may like to hike the same, familiar learning path to the summit, but we, as teachers, can help open up avenues and new perspectives by introducing and demonstrating new routes. Although learning a new way can take time and lengthen the "hike," it ultimately teaches our students that they have options, they can grow, and we can help them to exercise portions of the brain that are under utilized.

What are the 12 Ways of Learning
So instead of thinking about accommodating a fixed, “black or white” learning style, think about teaching students in kaleidoscopic ways, or using a multisensory approach to teaching that honors all 12 ways of processing information as outlined in the Eclectic Teaching Approach. This approach looks at:
  1. Visual Processing: incorporates pictures, drawings and even personal visualizations. This helps students learn through imagery. 
  2. Auditory Processing: involves learning through listening. This helps students to learn how to focus on and determine the salient information from what they are hearing. 
  3. Tactile Processing: consists of touching or feeling objects or artifacts. It also involves the encoding of information when taking notes or drawing things out. 
  4. Kinesthetic Processing: encompasses learning while moving one’s body. For many students, movement can help enhance engagement in learning and memory of information. 
  5. Sequential Processing: entails teaching students in a step by step format that sequences instruction by time, alphabetical order or a numerical series. This prepares students for outlines, timelines, completing long term assignments, and keeping materials organized. 
  6. Simultaneous Processing: involves teaching children how to categorize materials. This prepares students for webbing information, conceptualizing main ideas, understanding flow charts and diagrams, as well as keeping materials organized. 
  7. Verbal Processing: incorporates teaching children how to process ideas aloud. This helps students participate in class discussions and feel comfortable expressing ideas. 
  8. Interactive Processing: consists of teaching children how to work with others. This trains learners to collaborate and work in groups. 
  9. Logical/Reflective Processing: encompasses teaching children how to reflect upon or think about what they are learning. This prepares students to work independently and process ideas internally. 
  10. Indirect Experience Processing: entails teaching children how to watch and learn from a demonstration. This helps students attend to and glean information from vicarious learning experiences. 
  11. Direct Experience Processing: involves teaching children how to use their own environment to learn. This informs students that continuing education is ever present in our everyday surroundings and that there are fabulous learning experiences available through museums, aquariums, historic sites and other locales. 
  12. Rhythmic Melodic Processing: consists of teaching children how to use melodies and rhythm to learn. This provides students the tools to utilize beats, songs, or melodies when trying to memorize novel information. 
To learning more about the Eclectic Teaching Approach, come on over to Good Sensory Learning

So do Learning Styles Exist?
Yes they do, but to make learning most effective we need to look upon them as a symphony of individual instruments that work best in concert.

Would You Like to Watch a Video on This Content?
If so, please click on the image below. Be sure to like and comment on the video!!



Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz
Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Dyslexia Writing Technology: Voice Dream Writer

This blog shares my most recent video podcast, featuring dyslexia advocate and author, Winston Chen. Winston tells us all about the many benefits of his app Voice Dream Writer for individuals with dyslexia. This is the fifth of many free video podcasts for Go Dyslexia!

What is Voice Dream Writer?
Voice Dream Writer is an iOS app that can be used on an iPad or iPhone. It is an easy to use writing application that has a number of powerful features.

Voice Dream Reader Offers a Number of Helpful Tools:
  • Dictation or Voice to Text: Voice Dream Writer offers voice to text or dictation, so you can speak to your iPad or phone and the words will appear.
  • Proof Reading: Now you can edit your writing by listening to the text spoken aloud. Like a personal proofreader, Voice Dream Writer uses text-to-speech technology, so that awkward sentences, grammatical errors and typos can be easily found. It addition, Voice Dream Writer can read words and sentences as they’re typed or dictated so that errors can be corrected in the moment.
  • Word Finding and Definitions: Voice Dream Writer helps individuals find the right words through phonetic search or meaning search. For example, search for “inuf,”, and you will find “enough”, or search for “large balloon” by meaning and you will find “zeppelin.” Word Finder also shows the dictionary definition of a word.
  • Organizing Ideas: Voice Dream Writer automatically keeps a separate outline of headings, paragraphs and sentences. The Outline helps writers structure their writing and easily reorganize paragraphs and sections.  In addition, it allows the author to go anywhere in a document without endless scrolling.
Click the image below to watch our Video Podcast on YouTube:
I featured Winston Chen this past April in a blog and video podcast on Voice Dream Reader. Come watch my first video podcast with Winston Chen on his acclaimed app Voice Dream Reader.
**Click Below to SUBSCRIBE for More Videos:
https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user= warrenerica1

Let us know what you think!! Please help us spread the word by liking, commenting and sharing the video as well as this blog.

Dr. Erica Warren is the author, illustrator and publisher of multisensory educational materials at Good Sensory Learning and Dyslexia Materials. She is also the director of Learning to Learn and Go Dyslexia, in Ossining, NY. To learn more about her products and services, you can go to https://godyslexia.com/www.goodsensorylearning.comwww.dyslexiamaterials.com & www.learningtolearn.biz
Follow on Bloglovin
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...